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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 57 (some duplicates have been removed)
for the first time since 2009. so as congress agrees to delay a showdown over the debt ceiling and faces a march 1 deadline for across the board spending cuts, what to make of this darned economy, david? >> am i supposed to answer that? it is confusing. the stock market is up. employers are hiring, very slowly. the government now tells us that hey -- they hired a lot more last year than previously believed. auto seafls are up 14% from last year. housing sales are coming back. on the other hand the economy took a pause at the end of last year? unemployment is very high, 7.9%. among men between 25 and 54 one out of six is not working. so i think when you cut through all this what do you see? well, the stock market is going like this and the economy is going like this. that can't last. i can't explain the stock market except maybe there was a gigantic sigh of relief. the republicans aren't going to force the u.s. freshry due default and the europeans aren't going to blow themselves up economically. you see an economy that's growing -- slowly. growing is better than not growing. the europeans are tr
today the senate will vote on the house-passed legislation to suspend the debt ceiling until the summer and remove the specter of default hanging over the nation's economy. i suspect this will pass sending the message long and clear that while we're willing to negotiate on many things, we will not engay inch in another -- engage in another irresponsible debate over whether the united states government should pay its bills. most of my republican colleagues voted for the spending. what are some of those bills we've incurred? mr. president, we've had two wars going on that have been unpaid for with real money. we borrowed the money p. every republican voted for these wars. so we should pay our bills. i was reassured by house republicans' decision last week to back off their reckless threat to hold the debt ceiling hostage. dosuspending the debt limit will ensure we pay the bills we've already incurred. the legislation before the senate sets an important precedent that the full fanal and credit of the -- the full faith and credit of the united states will no longer be used as a pawn to extr
threatening to vote against raising the debt ceiling. if congress didn't act by august 2, the federal government would be unable to pay its bills. >> in 2010, when all these republicans were running for congress, ma of em awed tea partiers and the rest of them riding the tea party wave, the subject of the impending debt ceiling came up frequently and virtually all of them campaigned saying... pledging not to raise the debt ceiling. >> narrator: early on, republican freshmen attended orientation sessions. republican strategist frank luntz ran one of them. >> and i asked the question, how many of you are going to vote for the debt ceiling? and only three or four of them raised their hands. and i said, if you vote for the debt ceiling, the people who put you in office are going to knock you out. >> if you vote for the debt ceiling, you're voting for your own death certificate, political death certificate. >> narrator: for his part, the president decided to try something new: personal politics. he figured he could connect to the republican leader, john boehner. >> obama told his staff, jo
to fight all over again on this and maybe threaten something on the debt ceiling, which for them would be worse. >> one of the things that hasn't changed since the republicans saying these job numbers are terrible. we're going to keep cutting medical they get even worse. >> so in terms of the big battle and any kind of possible grand bargain, you think that's over continuing resolution and budget numbers? >> yeah. well, i mean, the first thing that comes up time-wise, is on march 1st we have to deal with the sequester because the republicans reordered the way that these things are going to fall on the calendar. the sequester is those automatic spending cuts. billions -- tens of billions of dollars just this year in spending cuts. the republicans would like to have some kind of spending cut win this year, and that might be their only opportunity to get one, so you can see them hunkering in and saying, you know, we're going take the hit on defense spending cuts, but we're going to get spending cuts here by hook or by crook, and for democrats they might say, you know, we would rather lose
can get it done sooner in the first half of the year, if possible. >> and remember that debt ceiling hostage taking? well, today, senate republicans passed the debt ceiling extension. so you're seeing a confident president determined to carry out his second term agenda and it's happening right now. joining me now is nia maliqa henderson and joan walsh. >> joan, two weeks into the second term, what do you think he can get done? >> well, you know, i'm semi-optimistic about immigration reform, reverend al, although i'm starting to have a few more doubts. you know, if democrats were like republicans, they would not help the republy c llicans out and d immigration reform. but the president is trying, chuck schumer has put together this bipartisan group. but the thing that seems like a big sticking point to me is even the supposedly pro-immigration forces are saying enforcement first. and they're ignoring the fact that this president has been all about enforcement. i mean, you know it better than i do. there is some civil rights folks who are entirely happy with some of the deportation pol
ceiling -- the last time i checked, 87 americans did not die from the fiscal cliff or the debt ceiling. they are dying from unrestricted access to guns and congress is to blame. >> jennifer: give us some hope. if you have to put your prognosticating hat on, which of the measures are going to get through this congress? will there be an assault weapons ban, background checks and a ban on high-capacity magazines. >> if general mccrystal continues to speak out that these are designed for war and maximum body damage, not for a civilized society, we might get that ban on assault weapons. we should get a universal background check for all gun sales so it's harder for criminals, the mentally ill and terrorist groups that come to u.s. gun shows because they can buy assault weapons without a background check in this country, we should be able to get that. the ban on high-capacity ammunition clips is just common sense. we should get consumer protection standards like we have for toy guns but not real guns and then lindsay graham is so disingenuous -- he has done everything
be fun to use a government shutdown or a debt ceiling crisis to force further cuts. you guys sure know how to show a gal a good time. there's no question over the long term we have to balance budgets and pay down our debts, but short-term deficit hawkishness is hurting us badly right now. our problem is not relief for storm victims or federal money for family planning services, it's a tax base that's too low to support rising health care costs and an aging population over the long term. let's deal with those problems over the long term. but for now, congress, how about we just try to avoid shooting ourselves in the foot. i know blaming government for a lack of spending is not the type of blaming government that the gop usually enjoys, but in lean times it's the only type of blaming government that we can afford. you know what would really be great is some stimulus, but you understand that's probably too much to ask for. so for now let's just keep the government from reversing the private sector-led recovery that is already under way. all right. that does it for us here at the cycle and
to extend the debt ceiling, but another budget battle could shut down the entire federal government. rich edson is lye on capitol hill for the fox business network. what's going on, rich? >> reporter: good afternoon, jon. in a couple of days, the senate will vote on a proposal to extend the debt ceiling out til may, so if the senate does, it heads to the white house for the president's signature, and that reorders the calendar of deadlines as far as spending is concerned, so next up would be the government spending cuts, the automatic spending cuts known as the sequester followed by march 27th a large chunk of government spending authority runs out. and without an agreement the, basically, no spending agreement there you'd have a government shutdown on may 18th, that's the next debt ceiling deadline if this does manage to pass the house and the u.s. senate and go to the president's desk for his signature. analysts are saying next up now is that big government spending fight dealing with the appropriations process, and it makes it more likely now with that up next that there could be a got
with this recent debt ceiling vote. i think, basically, business is going to have to come forward like with regard to the debt ceiling and say look, you can't do this. you are going to wreck the economy of the united states and wreck the economy of the world. i'm hoping that we won't get there. but, alex, i have to tell you, it would not shock me if we do. >> okay. let's switch gears. on the heels of the senate confirmation hearing for chuck hagel, has the political climate changed with the new members of congress on board? >> well, you know, with regard -- first of all, with regard to chuck hagel, the media basically reported that he got beaten up pretty bad. i didn't see it that way. i thought he held his own. i anticipate that we will have a lot of motion, commotion and emotion but chuck hagel will be confirmed. he'll do a great job. after all, the president should have the persons he wants to carry out his policy. i think that will be the case. with regard to the new congress, we have to have a wait and see situation. the number of tea partiers lost their seats. they're still a strong force in
't lose those spending cuts. that was to pay for the last debt ceiling increase, let aloney future increases. we're not interested in shutting government down. what happens on march 1, spending goes down automatically. march 27th is when the moment you're talking about, the continuing resolution expires. we are more than happy to keep spending at those levels going on into the future while we debate how to balance the budget, how to grow the economy, how to create economic opportunity. >> all right. now let's put this in context and think about what congressman ryan from wisconsin is really saying. republicans backed off their debt limit threat because they knew it was a political loser. and now they seem to be backing off their threat to shut down the government. sequester? well, that's another matter. if congress does nothing, the cuts take effect. republicans don't want defense cuts, but they might be willing to stomach those cuts because domestic programs would also get slashed, including medicare. and that's what republicans really want. let's turn to barney frank, former mass
would be that much under the debt limit. plus, the debt ceiling simply says we're not going to pay our bills. it just is illogical to say that's to pay for that. that's like going out and incurring costs which all of us did, republicans and democrats together, and then saying oh, and by the way, i'm not going to pay my bill unless you do me this enormous favor. but the other point i would make is this. he talks about, we need tax reform. the biggest single abuse in the tax code today, and it's a tough contest, is the one that says the richest people in america who run hedge funds can treat their earned income as if it were a capital gain. they call it carried interest. >> yeah. >> it means the rest of us are carrying them. and we voted to reduce that. and paul ryan boxed it. he is against that. and if you remember from that interview, he did not give a single specific about a tax break he wants to end, and he talked about cutting entitlements. >> he is up front saying no more revenue. i mean, that's their position on that. now, they've backed off the debt limit. now they're backing off
into further deficit and debt. >> obviously democrats would prefer a longer suspension of he debt ceiling which would provide additional economic security and stability as we continue to find ways to decrease the deficit. raising the possibility that the u.s. could default its obligations every few months is not an ideal way to run government but a short term solution is better than another imminent manufactured crisis. >> holman: the house already passed the bill. without it, the government would default on its obligations as early as mid-february. in economic news, americans' personal income grew in december, by the most in eight years. but first-time claims for jobless benefits were up last week. and on wall street today, the dow jones industrial average lost nearly 50 points to close at 13,860. the nasdaq fell a fraction of a point to close at 3,142. blinding snowfall and a slick freeway triggered a mile-long series of crashes in detroit today. at least three people were killed and 20 more injured. the pileups left a section of interstate 75 littered with wrecked cars and big-rig trucks. th
something like 25 -- >> no. it's more than that, george. but let's assume because the debt ceiling doesn't kick in till august, i believe that's what we'll have but let's add these together. let's say you're right, 30 billion. but let's -- jobs oversea, we can dial that however we want because it's all -- a huge loss of revenue, corporate jets. all kind of things that are low-hanging fruit. >> you've heard the republican as cross the board here. they're saying they're done with revenues for 2013. >> george, the american people are on our side. the american people don't believe in these austere things. we believe the rich should contribute. we believe we should fill those tax loopholes, get rid of them, i should say, and that's where we need to go. >> that's a debate that's been had as you know are to the last couple of months, last couple of years and doesn't appear it will get solved next month so the sequester will hit. >> greorge, that's what they sad two or three days before the fiscal cliff. no revenue. we got $700 billion. there's still more we can do. >> are you saying that for --
the debt ceiling compromise passed the senate. that's a fiscal crisis temporarily averted. it comes just a day after we learn that gdp, that's the mesh shush of how well our economy is performing, contracted by 0.1%. here is how some of the financial media covered it. quote, the best looking contraction in gdp you will ever see. and, quote, don't freak out about gdp. so what's going on here? less government spending happened. primarily in defense. that overshadowed more spending on the part of consumers and businesses, which is what these reporters were actually looking at. for more we go to jared bernstein a senior fellow on the center of budget and policy priorities and jonathan capehart a political opinion writer for "the washington post." welcome to both of you. >> thanks, karen. >> okay, jared. you know i like to come to you with these kinds of things. say what? it's good but it's bad? explain that one to me. >> well, sure. i mean, i already knew we were growing slowly. in fact, i'd say too slowly. i didn't think the economy was actually contracting before yesterday's report for the
for biotechnology, information and analysis, "biocentury this week." >>> congress has postponed the debt ceiling crisis. now the focus in washington has swung back to budgets and deficits. the nation is heading toward budget sequestration. for medicare this means a 2% spending cut. but that's just a downpayment. any serious attempt to tackle the deficit must curb the increase in medicare and medicaid spending. last week a kaiser family foundation report listed 150 ideas to reduce medicare spending. the problem is almost all of
the house back no, budget no, pay bill with the current debt ceiling of $64 trillion in mid-may when it is estimated to be $50 million more. the house and senate have to pass budget by mid-april or member paychecks will be held. >> the united states could default on the obligation every few months. not an ideal way to run a government. a short-term solution is better than another imminent manufacturered crisis. >> house republicans passed budget in the obama era and created the salary threat so senate democrats who have not do so this year. >> republicans tried to pass amendments that prioritize payments when cash runs first, pay interest first, social security and active duty military pay. and measure offsetting new debt with the matching spending cut. >> no gimmicks or timing shifts but these would be real cuts and growth in federal spending. >> democrats blocked each amendment. the no budget no, pay act sent unauthorred to the president for promiseed signature. >> the motion carries. >> there is no break in the battle. new deadlines loom. unless the two parties agree on a compromi
or the debt ceiling. they get the problems down the road-- >>> that's the problem -- >> well, joe. that is true. but the point about small business driving the economy. what is the biggest impediment? $1 trillion in new taxes that the president has imposed and also obamacare. let's be honest. the senate democrats don't move without the white house's okay -- >> well, actually i. the president needs to pass a budget and get serious, honestly about the debt and the regulation. he has 6,000 new regulations on the epa web site that i promise are going to hinder small business growth. i agree with you. both parties are to claim. but the president needs to take an honest look in the mirror. >> eric: how do we break this? where do you go for daylight? how do we get rid of the gridlock? >> if i could, thank you. i think we need to look at this in perspective. we know during the bush era, there were more epa regulations passed in the first four years of president obama's tenure. the real issue is, what small businesses want is access to capital. we have $4 tril trillion in our banks and our
the house bill to extend the debt ceiling. it permits the government to borrow billions to avoid default. the bill will now go to president obama for his signature. that's what we know for now. >>> on to the next story, the virginia state senate, this came in the last half hour, has passed legislation making it illegal to smoke with kids in the car. the bill would prohibit smoking in a car with a child under the age of 15. drivers would be ticketed, same way they would for traffic. that goes to the house now. >>> "parks and rec" amy poehler gets a book deal. >>> kourtney kardashian's boy grind describes a luxurious life. >>> here's georgia alfredas, host of "the russ parr show." georgia, the "new york post" story about dan marino and this lovechild has broken. the child he supposedly had with a production assistant. >> the child is only 7-year-old. to the rest of us, this seems like the biggest kept secret in nfl, but according to him, he'sing taking care of this kid for seven years, taking responsibility. he took responsibility then, and continues to take responsibility. however, we als
thing he can't avoid is the fiscal situation. there is a lot that has to happen between the debt ceiling and what are we going to do about the receiver? some of the issues he has to face and the large long-run budget that all of us want the policy makers to come together and figure out how we're going to do with it. unfortunately, it has to be front and center to come up with a solution of that. i hone it is. >> i think, first thing to remind ourselves of is that the impact of a president on the short-term economy is almost exaggerated. the president can have a big impact on the economy in the long-run large i will to influencing congress. we look to the white house and say what are you going to do about the economy right now? we have to talk about the jobs report and what is going to happen over the course of the next month. what is so frustrating you know that not much what you're doing does not have a direct link to what is going to happen over the next month. it is interesting about how the debate has shifted. four years ago it was about the short-term situation. now, the economy is
, are we going to shoot ourselves in the foot and not raise the debt ceiling? or not come to an agreement on varies things is one of the main things that can derail us. i'm more nervous about europe than some people. interest rates are down in some of the most troubled countries and their troubles are still there. we still have a risk to the economy. i don't see us heading off to a robust, fast recovery. i think 2013 will be better than 2012. i wish i could tell you that it would be really good because that's what we need. >> i don't call myself an economist. i specialize in economic policy. i try to be a good consumer of other forecasts. one thing i learned from that is frankly i don't trust any macro forecast that goes beyond six months. i don't think -- they are just guessing beyond that. i think we probably -- at least i would have similar reactions. i am still concerned about the risks posed by europe. i'm still quite concerned about the risks from things heating up in the middle east. the u.s. economy is repairing itself. we don't have at significant housing drag that we did a year
bill. connell: we have rich edson on capitol hill. rich: the senate is increasing a debt in the ceiling. that would allow spending through may 18. they can push that date even further into the summer. the debt ceiling moves out of the way for fight over government spending. it has already started. >> clearly, it is the spending that we have to deal. now is the perfect time to do so. the key to a robust recovery is to create jobs and grow. >> it is something that we know. we understand that. there is more to making our recall of an economy. rich: if any of the amendments pass, the bill then heads back to the house. the senate will very likely said this bill to the president's desk this evening. the sequester beginning in march in a large portion of government authority running out march 7. if they fail to reach a spending puma we will have another government shutdown. back to you. connell: let's bring in band manager. -- let's bring in dan and. the president is a bully. is that what that means? >> clearly, john boehner is now understanding that what is going on is he is in the thunder do
to delay having to debate raising the debt ceiling? >> well, it was a decision by house republican leaders a few weeks ago. they tried in 2011 to use the debt limit as a lynch -- leverage point to force obama to swallow spending u cuts. it worked but -- [inaudible] to something like 9%. and they recognize that it was a bad idea. i mean, gambling with the credit of the united it turned out is a bad idea. we were downgraded for the first time in nation's history. they department want to do that again. like i said, i didn't want to vote for a bigger national debt either. that doesn't fit with their philosophy. they came up with the strategy of saying we're going us is fend. and in the meantime, they want the senate to pass a budget for 2014 and the law salses that -- says that if either chamber fails to adopt a budget by april 15, the paychecks will be docked. the idea of the thing is to postpone the sort of economy raddling default situation until they can prosecute the continuing fight over taxes and spending to a point where, you know, both are satisfied and the debt limit can be raised ag
as it wants. the house and senate extended the debt ceiling. president obama has signed the no budget, no pay act of 2013. not only does that put off the nation's debt obligations until may 18th, it also withholds pay for a number of congressmen and womenless women unless they pass a budget by april. >>> eight senators have voted to block the violence against women act. that bill would protect victims of domestic violence and this particular version extends that care to illegal immigrants, native americans and lgbt members. senators who voted against considering that bill include ted cruz, marco rubio and rand paul, all republicans. more bill's up next. stay with us. to me now? you know the kind of guys that do reverse mortgage commercials? those types are coming on to me all the time now. (vo) she gets the comedians laughing and the thinkers thinking. >>ok, so there's wiggle room in the ten commandments, that's what you're saying. you would rather deal with ahmadinejad than me. >>absolutely. >> and so would mitt romney. (vo) she's joy behar. >>and the best part is that current will let
to come out then about mid may is the extension of the debt ceiling. but come back to your answer here, is that the motivation for harry reid not to produce a budget, he doesn't want to offend people? >> they d want to produce a budget because it makes you make choices. coming out of the 2010 election he was afraid and they were afraid of loosing their majority. they ae avoided every tough issue. we hardly did anything in the senate. when you have to budget you have to make decisions you can't speak in platte taoudz. that's why they've avoided doing a budget. think their time is up. they said they are going to produce a budget this year. that's important. look what we did this paul ryan's budget and how they beat it up. that's why they didn't want to produce one of their own. bill: it's my assumption that the senate produces a budget in april and it goes to the house and they say we are not moving on that. >> the normal process begins of negotiates where the two sides have to reconcile their differences in what they call a conference. this is the way this place is supposed to work not
of the debt ceiling vote to do wait has not done in the last four years and that is present a budget resolution for four years the senate said we don't care if the law requires us to do it. we'll ignore that. martha: let's hope dave camp's proposal of taking on tax reform is something republicans have been talking about for a long time. chinned with the fact that the senate must act on a budget must get us into tangibles in terms of this discuss in washington. carl, thank you so much. always good to talk to you. gregg: disturbing information about iran's nuclear program. martha: this is one of the most interesting moments of the game. the light went out. i thought this was a blowout game and the next thing you know -- a firsthand account from what it was like at the stadium from a familiar football fan. hey, it's me, progressive insurance. you know, from our 4,000 television commercials. yep, there i am with flo. hoo-hoo! watch it! [chuckles] anyhoo, 3 million people switched to me last year, saving an average of $475. [sigh] it feels good to help people save... with great discounts
overseas. your push right now is getting it back home. >> with the fiscal cliff and debt ceiling and trying to get bipartisan, but over here is something called poverty, 50 million americans and racial disparity and cities collapsing and the like. i'm going to make the case we should build america an urban infrastructural bank for the purpose of long-term loans. we do it in europe and japan. and no other country charges people to repatriate their money once they pay taxes in that country. but we do. but if we, in fact, took a portion of that money, part for research and development and part of it for an institutional bank, you could do what banks are not doing, and that's invest in these downtrodden areas of our country. >> gillian, we've been talking about it for years, trillions of dollars sitting on the sidelines not coming back to america. how do we get it back here? >> almost $2 trillion. you've got average household earnings down over the past four years, poverty is up. we need this money working in our economy. how do we get it here? >> absolutely. i think the reverend's idea is very
consensus to keep kicking the can down the road. i think the debt ceiling went like groundhog day. it's like this time we're going to have this debate. then at midnight on new year's eve we pass a bill and give senators six minutes to reid it before it goes and we've now avoided the fiscal by kicking the can down the road which now we passed a bill to push off until may the reckoning for the debt ceiling. nobody has come to the table to try to fix things. i say the senate hasn't actually passed a budget. the president and democrats haven't passed a budget in four years. there is a fundamental inability for congress to do their job. you are supposed to pass a budget by april 15. you are supposed to reconcile all those bills by october. that hasn't happened in four years. instead we've had this crisis atmosphere where things are passed in the middle of the night and nothing gets done. >> we only look at law makers records as they pertain to gun related issues. the numbers in the house and numbers of the senate haven't changed so much from the previous congress but there are faces that haven't
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 57 (some duplicates have been removed)